Culture Change, Image, and Adaptation: A Monthly Film Series at the Penn Museum

Culture Change, Image, and Adaptation, a new Penn Museum First Sunday Film Series, explores a wide range of recent documentary cinema, highlighting new forms of cultural adaptation in today's increasingly mobile and hybrid communities. Faculty experts from the University of Pennsylvania and other universities introduce each film, with open discussion following the screenings. Presented in association with the 2011-2012 Penn Humanities Forum on Adaptations, Penn Museum's First Sunday Film Series runs from October through May, beginning at 2:00 pm in the Museum's Rainey Auditorium, 3260 South Street. The new series is free with Museum admission.

Making_tartsPMwebOctober 2 Chinese Restaurants (Canada 2008)
While the Chinese restaurant is ubiquitous in nearly every corner of the globe, the nature of the food changes according to local taste, as do the restaurant owners, who are similarly changed by emigration. Event includes a small food tasting presented by the Museum's Pepper Mill Café. Speakers: Dr. Jane Kauer, Penn Anthropology, and Dr. Emily Hannum, Penn Sociology. The program is sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies, University of Pennsylvania.

reelinjun_1PMwebNovember 6 Reel Injun (Canada 2010)
Cree filmmaker Neil Diamond takes a look at the Hollywood Indian, exploring the portrayal of North American Natives through a century of cinema. Reel Injun traces the evolution of cinema's depiction of Native people from the silent film era to today, with clips from hundreds of classic and recent Hollywood movies, and candid interviews with celebrated Native and non-Native film celebrities, activists, film critics, and historians. Speaker: John Sanchez, Visiting Professor, Annenberg School and Anthropology Department, University of Pennsylvania. The program is sponsored by the Anthropology Department, University of Pennsylvania, and the Greenfield Intercultural Center.

December 4 Pushy Women (Japan 2001)
Women sumo wrestlers in Japan are the subject of this documentary, which provides a glimpse of an atypical profession-both the physical difficulties and the triumphs. Speaker: Dr. Ayako Kano, East Asian Studies, University of Pennsylvania. The program is sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies, University of Pennsylvania and the Penn Humanities Forum.

January 8 Photo Wallahs (India 1992)
In India, there are still itinerant portrait photographers who make pictures for people who do not have cameras. How has picture making changed over time? The film focuses on the photographers of Mussoorie, a hill station in the Himalayan foothills of northern India whose fame has attracted tourists since the 19th century. Speakers: Amardeep Singh, Post-Colonial Literatures, Lehigh University; and Kate Pourshariati, Penn Museum Film Archivist. The program is sponsored by the South Asia Center, University of Pennsylvania.

men_of_words1PMwebFebruary 5 Men of Words (Yemen 2009)
This film takes place in Yemen, where the tradition of poetry and rhetoric have taken form in the late 20th century as political discourse, distributed via audiocassette. Vendors sell audiocassette dubs that contain "throw-downs," that is, challenges and replies by famed poets. For people in small towns without newspapers, this has become the virtual op-ed section. Speaker: Dr. Steve Caton, Harvard University. The program is sponsored by the Middle East Center, University of Pennsylvania.

March 4 Settling Down (Ireland 2004)
Ireland's Traveller community-traditionally a rural nomadic people-has survived despite the effects of modernization. Based on the experiences of one particular Traveller community in Cork, this film looks at the ways in which their culture and identity have been altered as a result of broader changes within Ireland and asks what the future may hold for a people under increasing pressure to settle. Speaker: Dr. Tim Corrigan, Cinema Studies Program and English Department, University of Pennsylvania. The program is sponsored by the Cinema Studies Department, University of Pennsylvania.

pomegranate3PMwebApril 1 Tehran Has No More Pomegranates! (Iran 2007)
Contrasting archival footage from the early 20th century with films of 2009, filmmaker Massoud Bakshi presents a portrait of Tehran, Iran as it was and as it continues to change-a view virtually unseen in the west. Speaker: Dr. Pardis Minuchehr, George Washington University. The program is sponsored by the Middle East Center, University of Pennsylvania.

May 6 Future Remembrance (Ghana 1998)
This film looks at the use of photography and portraiture in Ghana. In West Africa, people have adapted studio photography portraiture to send messages about their own status. Speaker: Dr. John Jackson, Jr., Anthropology Department, University of Pennsylvania. The program is sponsored by the African Studies Center, University of Pennsylvania.

The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology is dedicated to the study and understanding of human history and diversity. Founded in 1887, the Museum has sent more than 400 archaeological and anthropological expeditions to all the inhabited continents of the world. With an active exhibition schedule and educational programming for children and adults, the Museum offers the public an opportunity to share in the ongoing discovery of humankind's collective heritage.

Penn Museum is located at 3260 South Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (on Penn's campus, across from Franklin Field). Public transportation to the Museum is available via SEPTA's Regional Rail Line at University City Station; the Market-Frankford Subway Line at 34th Street Station; trolley routes 11, 13, 34, and 36; and bus routes 12, 21, 30, 40, and 42. Museum hours are Tuesday and Thursday through Sunday, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm, and Wednesday, 10:00 am to 8:00 pm, with P.M. @ PENN MUSEUM evening programs offered select Wednesdays. Closed Mondays and holidays. Admission is $10 for adults; $7 for senior citizens (65 and above); $6 children (6 to 17) and full-time students with ID; free to Members, PennCard holders, and children 5 and younger; "pay-what-you-want" the last hour before closing. Hot and cold meals and light refreshments are offered to visitors with or without Museum admission in The Pepper Mill Café; the Museum Shop and Pyramid Shop for Children offer a wide selection of gifts, books, games, clothing and jewelry. Penn Museum can be found on the web at www.penn.museum. For general information call 215.898.4000. For group tour information call 215.746.8183.

Image captions (listed top to bottom): Movie still, "Chinese Restaurants," Credit: Cheuk Kwan, Tissa Films, Copyright 2008. Movie still, "Reel Injun," Credit: Cheuk Kwan, Tissa Films, Copyright 2008. Movie still, "Men of Words," Credit: Johanne Haaber Ihle Royal Anthropological Institute, Copyright 2009. Movie still, "Iran Has No More Pomegranates!" Credit: Massoud Bakshi, DER films, Copyright 2007.

MUSEUM LOCATION

3260 South Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 898-4000

MUSEUM HOURS

Tuesday-Sunday: 10:00am - 5:00pm
First Wednesdays: 10:00am - 8:00pm
Monday: CLOSED

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