The Museum will open at 1 pm on Sunday, June 20 due to construction.
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Jazz Combos

Pushing the Limits

Sunday, April 18, 2021 |
4:30PM - 6:00PM ET

This is a virtual event.
A person listening to music

Location

Virtual Event - Penn Museum

Category

Part of the Penn Museum Year of Jazz

So you think you know about jazz? “Pushing the Limits” highlights the interdisciplinary and creative nature of jazz from its inception to the cutting edge of performance and composition. In this live conversation, a professional musician and a neuroscientist will share their experiences with jazz, discussing how the genre has impacted their lives. The speakers will reveal some of the far-reaching impacts of jazz, showing how its psychological and musical components encourage people to find their creative voices.

Our Speakers

David Cutler, Ph.D., is the director of music entrepreneurship at the University of South Carolina. He performs, arranges and composes in a wide array of styles, including jazz. A fervent arts enthusiast, Dr. Cutler encourages students to find their creative voice, notably through his SuperNova composition, which dramatically re-imagines traditional pieces in Suzuki Violin Book 1. He also leads keynotes and workshops designed to help artists innovate and make an impact, while also earning an income. Alongside his consulting firm, The Puzzle Company, Dr. Cutler works with arts, education, and business organizations to foster innovation.

Roger Beaty, Ph.D., is an assistant professor at Penn State University, where he serves as the principal investigator of the Cognitive Neuroscience of Creativity Laboratory (CNCL). He received his Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and completed his postdoctoral training in cognitive neuroscience at Harvard University. A psychologist and neuroscientist, Dr. Beaty studies the processes of the brain involved in solving complex problems. His research interests also include creative thinking and related cognitive functions. His work is currently funded by the National Science Foundation.

Free to Registered Guests

Buy Tickets

Part of the Penn Museum Year of Jazz